The Chicago City Council has amended the business licensing code that opens up the possibility for more businesses to apply for liquor licenses where previously their location had prevented them from doing so.

Last Wednesday, City Council adopted ordinance O2018-7001, which will make it easier for business owners near sensitive uses to get a liquor license without having to obtain support from their state legislator. The law gives the local liquor control commissioner the authority to reduce the distance requirement between liquor license applicants and anything.

Before the ordinance was passed, business owners within 100 feet of places of worship, schools, hospitals, senior or veteran housing, and military and naval stations would have to get the support of their state legislators to change state law (with the governor's signature) to allow a liquor license.

Business owners within 100 feet of a Chicago Public Library branch location could get approved by the local liquor control commissioner (currently Shannon Trotter) without state support.

Now, the law gives the local liquor control commissioner the authority to reduce the distance requirement between liquor license applicants and anything.

MAP Strategies can help all businesses obtain the necessary permits and licenses through our 60-day opening plan.

The diagram shows how the 100 foot radius affected business owners' eligibility to apply for and receive a liquor license. Now, the Local Liquor Control Commissioner can consider local factors and reduce the distance between the applicant and the nearby sensitive use.

The law – which takes advantage of a change in state law, SB2436 – took effect upon passage, but Alders Reilly (42nd Ward), O'Shea (19), and King (4) voted against it. The Daily Line reported the reasons why Reilly and O'Shea voted against it.